Author Archives: helenpallett

New paper on organisational learning and participation

At the end of September I had a new paper published in the journal Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, based on my PhD research on organisational learning in the UK Government’s public dialogue body Sciencewise. I was particularly proud to see this little labour of love come out as it tries to give people an insight into my ethnographic work in an around Sciencewise’s public dialogue exercises on science policy. This is, as far as I am aware, the first extended ethnography of an organisation of participation which has been carried out. I also got to play around a bit with theories of space and learning, which I think was productive.

Transactions paperThe paper is available to read open access here.

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Decolonising geographies of democracy and participation: RGS conference panel

Royal_Geographical_Society_building_in_London

I’m starting to get excited for the Royal Geographical Society’s annual conference in two weeks’ time. In particular I’m looking forward to some full and frank discussions about the challenges of decolonising the discipline of Geography, and to some really exciting looking keynotes – including Pat Noxolo and Juanita Sundberg. I’m also looking forward to taking part in a panel session with some of my academic heroes to remember the late great Professor Sally Eden and to discuss her recently published book Environmental Publics.

The main event of the conference for me is the panel session I’m organising on ‘Decolonising geographies of democracy and participation’ which is an area I am currently getting really interested in. I wrote some more about the rationale and scope for the panel in a previous post, but now the programme is up I can also share with you the excellent line-up of papers and authors I have been able to assemble. You can read the full panel rationale and abstracts in the programme here.

  1. Decolonising the collective: towards new visions of representation – Doerthe Rosenow (Oxford Brookes University, UK)
  2. The challenges of the ‘post-liberal’ turn in the Plurinational State of Bolivia – Anna Laing (University of Sussex, UK)
  3. Towards decentred and emergent governance for ‘community resilience’: The view from post-war Sri Lanka – Martin Mulligan (RMIT University, Australia)
  4. The right to the knowledge: urban movements and decolonisation of the spatial planning process – Tomasz Sowada (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland)
  5. Migrant women and participatory social research: decolonising geographies of participation – Tracey Reynolds (University of Greenwich, UK)(presenter); Umut Erel (Open University, UK); Eren Kaptani (Open University, UK); Maggie O’Neill (University of York, UK)

If this is a topic you are interested in and/or something which intersects with your work, please do come along to the panel on Wednesday 30th August, 14.40-15.20 in the Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Lecture Theatre G34. I’m keen to get some broader conversations going on this, so there will be opportunities for you to make your voice heard on this important topic.

Academic summer resolutions

I’ve got a busy summer ahead of me including running a field course to Southern Spain, writing material for a new module which starts in the Autumn semester, trying to finish a few papers which really just need to be submitted already, and also the small matter of getting married at the end of August.

I have always struggled to be productive during academic summers – I much prefer the regular meetings and short-term deadlines of term time – and I have a particularly large amount that I want to achieve this summer, on top of taking on new responsibilities as part of my lectureship. I’ve come up with a few resolutions which I hope are going to help me have a happy and productive summer, which I thought I would share here in the hope that this will make me more likely to follow them. There might also be something in here which will be of use to others, so feel free to use them or to share your own tips.

In summer 2017 I will…

  1. Check my emails once per day, deal with them, and then close my inbox
  2. Spend 60 mins writing on my current project each morning before emails or social media
  3. Try to focus on one main thing per week
  4. Do yoga or go for a walk every day
  5. Prioritise getting enough sleep
  6. Read every day & update my ‘to-read’ folder on Mendeley

Mapping UK energy participation

Our new UK Energy Research Centre report is now available to download from the UKERC website. This report summarises the findings from the systematic mapping of UK energy participation 2010-2015 which I carried out in 2016 in collaboration with my colleagues Jason Chilvers and Tom Hargreaves. As far as I am aware this is the first project which has attempted to map participation related to energy in this way, and this work has brought up a whole host of new insights about public engagement and the energy system.

LCCC

Photo from the UK Government’s Low Carbon Communities Challenge process which was carried out 2010-2011

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RGS-IBG CFP Decolonising geographies of democracy and participation

I currently have a call for papers out for a panel at the Royal Geographical Society’s Annual International Conference this summer on the topic of ‘Decolonising geographies of democracy and participation’. This is my response to the events of 2016 – including Brexit and Trump – focussing on what this means for how we think about democracy and participation. I was troubled by some of the assumptions which were being made about democracy, participation and the public through these events and the response to these events, so I have created a space to think about and debate this more deeply. I’m also using this as an opportunity to pursue my growing interest in post-colonial and feminist perspectives on citizens and subjects.

Please do share this with anyone who you think might be interested, and I’m also very interested to hear your thoughts and collect suggested readings around this topic.

 

london-brexit-protest

London protest against the Brexit campaign, image from BBC newsbeat

Call for Papers: RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, London, Tuesday 29th August – Friday 1st September 2017

Session: Decolonising geographies of democracy and participation

Convener: Dr Helen Pallett (University of East Anglia)

Sponsored by the Participatory Geographies Research group (PyGyRg) of the RGS-IBG

The events of 2016, from Brexit to Trump’s victory in the US election, have led many to claim that democracy is in crisis (e.g. Levitsky & Ziblatt, 2016). In particular, the project of multiculturalism has been held up by Western commentators and theorists of democracy, such as Jürgen Habermas (discussed in Bhambra, 2016), as a potential threat to genuine democratic participation and as fuel for right wing populism (cf. Lentin, 2016; Wilson, 2016). Post-colonial perspectives counter that these arguments fail to recognise the long histories of global interconnectedness through the European imperial project, which laid the foundations of liberal democratic institutions and practices (Bhambra, 2015; Jazeel, 2011).

These ‘democracy in crisis’ arguments are often based upon universalising and fixed models of democracy and assumptions about the public. For example, deliberative democratic theories are widely evoked, envisaging a harmonious deliberative public sphere enabled by a relatively homogenous and well-informed populous. Though, agonistic theories of democracy are also evoked and equally make normative assumptions about democracy and the public, emphasising discord and debate. By perpetuating fixed assumptions about democracy, participation and the public, these kinds of approaches fail to recognise the relational and interconnected way in which democratic practices and ideals are produced – discursively, spatially, materially and institutionally – and the global diversity of existing ways of understanding and practicing democratic participation. Furthermore, these fixed assumptions shape the way in which we study and intervene in democratic practices, potentially excluding certain knowledges and bodies (Spivak, 1988) and foreclosing what can be said or done within such processes (Chilvers & Kearnes, 2016).

To begin this project of decolonising geographies of democracy and participation, contributions to this panel could:

  • explore what is excluded and marginalised by these dominant and universalising perspectives on democracy;
  • seek to challenge them by exploring the global diversity of ideas about and practices of democratic participation, and drawing on insights from post-colonial and feminist theories;
  • follow the connections, flows and interdependencies of particular ideas about and practices of democratic participation;
  • or propose methodological innovations which can help geographers to do participation and democracy in a decolonial way.

Please email proposed titles and abstracts (250 words) or any questions you have to Helen Pallett (h.pallett[at]uea.ac.uk) by 10th February. The format of the session(s) will be the presentation of 4-5 selected papers each lasting 15 minutes.

References

Bhambra, G.K., 2016. Whither Europe? Interventions, 18(2), pp.187–202.

Bhambra, G.K., 2015. Citizens and Others: The Constitution of Citizenship through Exclusion. Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 40(2), pp.102–114.

Chilvers, J. & Kearnes, M., 2016. ‘Participation in the Making: Rethinking public engagement in co-productionist terms’ pp 31-63 in Remaking Participation: Science, Environment and Emergent Publics Chilvers and Kearnes (eds) London: Routledge-Earthscan.

Jazeel, T. 2011. Spatializing Difference Beyond Cosmopolitanism: rethinking planetary futures. Theory Culture & Society, 28(5), 75-97.

Lentin, A. 2016. The ‘Crisis of Multiculturalism’ and the Global Politics of Trumpism. Sociological Review blog site. 4th December 2016. Available at: https://www.thesociologicalreview.com/blog/the-crisis-of-multiculturalism-and-the-global-politics-of-trumpism.html

Levitsky, S. & Ziblatt, D. 2016. Is Donald Trump a Threat to Democracy? New York Times. December 16th 2016. Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/16/opinion/sunday/is-donald-trump-a-threat-to-democracy.html

Spivak, G.C., 1988. Can the Subaltern Speak? Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture, pp.271–312.

Wilson, H. F. 2016. Brexit: on the rise of ‘(in)tolerance’. Society and Space blog site. 21st October 2016. Available at: http://societyandspace.org/2016/11/21/brexit-on-the-rise-of-intolerance/

 

Summer conference panels on relational and systemic participation — 3S (Science, Society and Sustainability) Research Group

Reposting news of the conference panels that Jason Chilvers and I have organised on relational and systemic participation, coming out of our UK Energy Research Centre-funded project.

Members of the 3S group have organised panel sessions at three different European conferences over the summer of 2016 on the topic of relational and systemic approaches to public participation in science, innovation and sustainability transitions. These panels all draw on conceptual, methodological and empirical innovations in the 3S group from the recent Remaking Participation book and […]

via 3S summer conference panels on relational and systemic participation — 3S (Science, Society and Sustainability) Research Group

Beyond experiments in climate governance workshop

There are some very interesting reflections here from Paula Kivimaa, Bruno Turnheim and Frans Berkhout on the ‘Beyond experiments: understanding how climate governance innovations become embedded’ INOGOV workshop which I attended at Sussex University at the end of April.

INOGOV_logo_orange_bars_boxed_white-e1433317708607The workshop was particularly enjoyable because of the excellent group of people that Paula, Bruno and Frans had assembled to contribute to the book, and it was great to get to know several people whose work has been quite influential for me, as well as being introduced to the work of others who I hadn’t been aware of. I discussed my contribution to the workshop here, which I’m now going to refine and improve based on our discussions at the workshop, and the feedback I received from the other participants. Final chapter drafts are due at the end of August, which will hopefully lead to a reasonably quick turnaround at the publisher’s end. I think there is going to be much of interest in this collection, including some contributions with the potential to greatly impact thinking on climate governance and transitions.